Remembering the time that my husband and I were mistakenly arrested

whitesandshiking

I was feeling a little down today, so I decided to get out my old laptop computer and log onto my graphics design program. Creating graphic designs is one of the best ways I have found to change my mood for the better.

As my Printmaster program opened, this picture came up on the screen… along with a lot of memories. My husband took this photo a little over nine years ago, as we were hiking through White Sands National Monument with our rescued cattle dog, Lady.

The night before this picture was taken, we were driving on an icy, dark, isolated mountain road in the southern part of New Mexico when we were stopped by a sheriff’s deputy and the border patrol and arrested at the point of assault rifles. After they ran our driver’s licenses they realized we weren’t the outlaws they were looking for and we were promptly released, with profuse apologies.

Although it was over very quickly, it was a terrifying experience — especially for two people with PTSD, both of whom have a history of trauma involving guns! Hiking through White Sands the next day put us right again.

I think it’s time for another hike. Lady isn’t with us anymore, she went over the rainbow bridge in 2015. But we have two other rescue dogs that have never been to White Sands. 🐩 πŸ•

PS: After our hike, we stopped by the Sheriff’s office to thank them for everything they do to keep the public safe, often at great risk to themselves, and to assure the Sheriff that there wouldn’t be any blow back from us over the false arrest. The Sheriff was surprised, to say the least. But they were looking for a heavily armed, violent man who happened to be driving a vehicle identical to ours, so the mistake was understandable. And thankfully, nobody was hurt, although we were scared half to death, for a few minutes!

Hiking through the incredible beauty of God’s creation — it does a body good.

LadyWagMoreBarkLess1024

22 thoughts on “Remembering the time that my husband and I were mistakenly arrested

  1. Linda Lee/@LadyQuixote May 3, 2019 / 12:46 pm

    Thank you, Ryan. Lady actually had PTSD, too. We got her in 2007 from a no kill rescue organization. The woman that ran the organization told us that she had been adopted and brought back “many, many times” during the previous 8 or 9 months before we adopted her. People kept bringing her back because of her extreme behavior issues.

    Within the first 48 hours, we realized what the problem was. Lady had PTSD! The slightest thing would freak her out. She was having flashbacks! She also had terrible nightmares every time she fell asleep.

    Lady was the perfect dog for us, and we were the perfect people for her. Together, we all three learned to overcome our PTSD issues.

    Liked by 3 people

    • ibikenyc May 4, 2019 / 12:00 pm

      Awww! Happy-Weepy Warm Fuzzies! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Salvageable May 3, 2019 / 1:09 pm

    I never heard of the rainbow bridge before yesterday, when my daughter brought home a plaque for the spot where we will bury our cat this weekend. Now you use the term today. I looked it up on Wikipedia, and I like the thought. J.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Lee/@LadyQuixote May 3, 2019 / 2:21 pm

      Aww. Tears, again.

      My stepdaughter, whom I have grown to love like my own daughter, lost her precious old chihuahua on New Year’s eve. A few weeks prior to this, my stepdaughter came by for a visit with her three dogs. Although she looked and behaved the same as always, somehow I knew in my spirit that I would never see the oldest dog, Millie, alive again. Sensing this, I waited until I was alone with Millie, then I held her in my arms and prayed for her. I also asked her to tell our Lady girl how much I miss her, when she gets to heaven. I knew Millie would remember Lady.

      I did not say anything to my stepdaughter about what I felt the Lord was telling me, because I didn’t want to upset her. But when she got home from her job on December 31, she called me a few minutes later. I answered the phone, and all I heard was sobbing.

      “Is it Millie?” I said.

      “Mom, she’s dying!” my stepdaughter said.

      I cried with her as Millie took her final breaths. Then my husband went and stayed the night with his daughter. A few days later, when the crazy weather here in New Mexico warmed up enough that we could dig a grave, we buried sweet Millie.

      We brought our two dogs with us, and they were in the yard while we dug the grave. Millie’s body was in a small cooler, frozen solid. The whole time we were there, our big yellow lab German shepherd mystery mix dog, Baby, that my stepdaughter and I had rescued off the streets in July 2016, kept crying. She was purposefully sniffing all the places where Millie used to lay, and crying at each place. Baby never does that!

      Oh yes, I believe God gave our precious pets a soul. When Lady died in my arms, in March 2015… I don’t believe I have ever cried harder.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Salvageable May 3, 2019 / 4:04 pm

        This has been a tear-filled week for all of us here. Odd that Millie died the last day of the year, because we lost two cats around that time of year. Hermia had a heart attack and died on the second of January some twenty years ago, and Lysander spent several weeks in a hospice situation like Bo’s before fading away on the last day of the year sixteen years ago. J.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. seekingdivineperspective May 3, 2019 / 1:57 pm

    How kind of you to stop by and assure them it was OK, and to thank them. Not many people would have done that. Not many people think to thank our law enforcement, but where would we be without them? I’m sure that made their day.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Lee/@LadyQuixote May 3, 2019 / 2:30 pm

      Thank you. I don’t remember, now, if it was my husband’s idea first, or mine. I think it actually came to both of us, around the same time. This happened not long after there had been a mass shooting on a military base in Texas. And where we were, in southeastern New Mexico, wasn’t very far from there. So it was natural that the law enforcement agencies would be on edge.

      What really amazed me was that my husband wanted to do that, to thank even the officers who had ordered us out of our truck with assault rifles pointed right at us. The last time my husband faced something like that, he was a Marine Corps rifleman in Vietnam. That’s where his PTSD comes from. My traumatic experiences with guns, only involved a small handgun. Still potentially very deadly, but … different, you know?

      God heals the broken in heart and binds up their wounds. Even the brokenness of PTSD.

      Liked by 4 people

      • seekingdivineperspective May 3, 2019 / 3:01 pm

        I can’t help thinking that by deliberately going back and facing them again, as friends and appreciative civilians, might have had a healing influence on your husband. I’m no psychologist, but it seems in the category of “facing your fears.” God bless your husband.

        Liked by 2 people

  4. Lee Poskey May 3, 2019 / 3:24 pm

    I remember white sands was a big deal to the people in Clovis new Mexico, where my late aunt Tillie lived that I used to visit. Me and my brother Jimmy used to have the funnest time out there.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Linda Lee/@LadyQuixote May 3, 2019 / 4:07 pm

    You know what, Lee? You make a great point. Thanks!

    Lately, I have been looking at the temporal, not the eternal. My husband had heavy exposure to agent orange in Vietnam. When his battalion broke camp, my husband and some of the other young Marines were ordered to spray the area down with the toxic herbicide. No one knew how dangerous that poison is, least of all those kids right out of high school. They actually sprayed it on each other, on purpose, just “having fun.” My husband has had many health issues since then, which the VA determined to have been caused by agent orange. Many cancers are also believed to be related to agent orange exposure. Within the past few years, several of his Vietnam veteran friends have begun to succumb to cancer.

    My husband was also stationed at Camp Lejeune, where the water was contaminated by many other chemicals, which also wasn’t known by the Marines at the time. Again, although I don’t know how they have proven the direct cause and effect, a large percentage of the Marines that were stationed there during that timeframe, are now coming down with various cancers.

    Earlier this week, my husband’s doctor removed four large inflamed growths, one on each side of his chest, and two on his upper arm. We should learn the results of the biopsies this coming Wednesday, when he has a follow-up appointment. In the meantime, I feel like we are both holding our breath, and running out of oxygen. And at least one of us has been uncommonly cranky. πŸ˜‰

    Unless Jesus comes back first, nobody is getting out of this life alive. I know this. I just really hate cancer. And I really love my (cranky) husband.

    But I need to get my eyes off the temporal, and onto the eternal. Thank you for the gentle reminder, Lee.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. hawk2017 May 3, 2019 / 8:35 pm

    I also think the the other dogs should go for a hike to see God’s creation.:))

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Alexis Rose May 4, 2019 / 8:36 am

    Whoa, how scary!! I know that Lady is peaceful over the rainbow bridge. β€οΈπŸ’

    Liked by 1 person

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